Culture and Marketing

Change in Media, Change in Targets

It’s time to update the idiom. There are three things certain in life: death, taxes, and…branding. People are exposed to thousands of commercials in various mediums every day, including radio, television, social media and print. This adds up and evolves, resulting in the average individual adult or child being exposed to countless varied ad instances every year. But quantity is not the only thing that is changing. In the past, advertising was largely a one-way communication. Now, customers are taking control of the products, services, and the way they interface with them. In other words, audiences can volley back and participate in the millions of advertising interactions they experience every day. “It is shared communication, not only between the firm and customers but between actors in the marketplace.”

This dynamic personalization has advanced the industry beyond just marketing to personas, segments, and averages. We can be more specific in our design – we have the technology – and that has upped the bar. Today’s marketer should be able to 1) recognize every customer as an individual, delivering 1-1 experiences that feel one-of-a-kind in the hearts and minds of consumers, 2) know the discrete intention of every engagement, and 3) own every moment. Thus, the future of marketing lies in the battle for these micro-moments, shared in the space between the brand itself and the consumer’s response. Creating trust in this space, between brand and audience, is then vital. And the internet is influencing this interaction.

It is easy to see, then, that the moving target that is impactful advertising is only moving more quickly as the nature of advertising continues to evolve. Mass marketing isn’t dying, but it is definitely going through some natural selection. This denotes a change in what has long defined the consumer marketplace as fragmentation and niche groups come to define cultural patterns and, as such, hyper-targeted audiences. Increasingly sophisticated technology has enabled consumers to skip over these mass-market models, allowing people to quickly and easily search out specific products that speak to them. And data shows that this new self-curated buyer journey leads to consumers committing their dollars to brands that, across digital channels, give them content they care about1. In other words, people are choosing brands that help them define their individual identities and build their tribes over brands lacking a certain cultural trust or significance.

In this cultural resonance we find a huge opportunity for brands: people don’t hate advertising as much as they may claim. Now more than ever, brands are part of culture and identity – i.e. things consumers want to cultivate. 83% of people agree with the statement “Not all ads are bad, but I want to filter out the really obnoxious ones.”3  Translation: consumers don’t hate ads so much as they hate irrelevant ads, meaning ads that don’t speak to them functionally or emotionally. To endure now, successful brands must adopt a process that gives consumers a more relevant experience wherever and however they shop4. The experience will need to continuously optimize based on cues from the market and the target audiences2. This strategy will improve conversion rates, foster communities, and drive advocacy. Ultimately, brands with staying power will create a steady reciprocal relationship with their consumers, turning them into powerful ambassadors and fanatics.

So what do I mean by culture here? Culture is the sum total of shared values, ideas, beliefs, behaviors, and ideology of a group of people. You might say it is the glue that holds groups of people together and shapes their identity. Drawing on our extensive experience working in cultural influence, we tend to agree. When developing a campaign or marketing plan, other people tend to focus on benefits, features, and superficial aspects of the target audience. But, when we talk about a focus on “culture” we are talking about the deeper emotions, motivations, and associations people have with an activity, product, or service, many of which are subconscious. Culture is not a trend, though trends may impact it. Rather, culture is comprised of cognitive, social, and conceptual “frames” that people build upon. Think “pants”. Stylistically they change over time and if you make them, you better stay on top of the trends. But at a deeper cultural level we have an understanding of what pants are regardless of time. Understanding the deeper concept – what signals pants versus what makes bell-bottoms – and how it’s constructed gives you an incredible amount of power.

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Perhaps the most important piece to remember is that culture is a process. Culture is shared interactions, which means it is fluid. The reification of culture (regarding culture as a thing) leads to a notion that “it” is a thing that can act almost independently of human agency. But culture does not. Culture is subject to change and change can be controlled, or at least influenced, in any number of ways, including how we insert a brand into a person’s life. There are undercurrents and motifs that remain focal points through time, but they are always subject to restructuring. We are able to harness this cultural restructuring into a step-by-step analysis to approach, influence, and react to audiences.

First, cultural change is a selective process. Whenever cultures are presented with new ideas, they do not accept everything indiscriminately2. A marketing message or innovation is most likely to be diffused into a recipient culture if: (1) it is seen to be superior to what already exists; (2) it is consistent with existing cultural patterns; (3) it is easily understood in the context of their symbolic and functional constructs; (4) it is able to be tested on an experimental basis; and (5) its benefits are clearly visible.

Second, new ideas, objects, or techniques are usually reinterpreted and reworked so that they can be integrated more effectively into the total configuration of the recipient culture. In other words, people don’t simply consume marketing, they interpret and reinvent it.

Third, some cultural traits are more easily accepted than others. By and large, technological innovations are more likely to be borrowed than are social patterns or belief systems, largely because the usefulness of a particular technological trait can be recognized quickly. But technological advancement can only get you so far. For instance, by any reasonable measure, the US should have adopted the metric system by now. The thing preventing it is a lack of cultural connection. The same process holds true for brands.

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This cultural function means that the brand someone selects, that she is loyal to, is driven more by the deep emotional and cultural needs than by features and benefits. The sustainable brand, the brand that draws people to it again and again, reflects cultural truths. When you identify those deeper truths, you build a much deeper, more authentic connection both to that individual and to their “tribe”. From a strategic perspective, it provides you with more nuanced and adaptive creative, the ability to identify the right channels and platforms in which to market, and a long-term roadmap to evolve your communication as the brand grows. At a practical level, it means sustainable ROI and target audience ownership.

We believe that to be relevant and long-lasting a brand – one that sees return on innovation and investment – must operate like a member of culture alongside its consumers. A company must share out its core values and articulate WHY it exists. A brand must stand for something and drive people to participate in it, become part of it. People want to belong to something bigger than themselves.

 So, we know we must tap into a brand’s cultural depth with its audience. We need to build and recognize trust and grab a piece of it. And that’s how you get a share of culture. If we were to define it for a textbook, we’d say Share of Culture is the positive feelings, attitudes and beliefs shared between a brand and its audience. We believe the key to creating marketing campaigns that resonate today is to leverage your audience’s culture, seeing the bigger picture and building a reciprocal space. And, in the end, placing your audience’s culture at the center of marketing strategies creates sustainable ROI because culture has the power to nurture stronger, longer lasting and more engaged relationships with your audiences.

To be relevant and long-lasting, a brand must operate like a member of a culture – an equal participant. At the same time, it must own a piece of it. To rephrase, a company must share out its core values and articulate WHY it exists. And because people want to belong to something bigger than themselves9., when they make a purchase – whether it be a home, a new gaming system, or vacation package – they are actually using that product or service to add meaning to their lives. The meaning that has been created in the goods and services is not intrinsic to those goods and services. The meaning is created as the brand interacts with culture. It’s actually our culture that says a diamond has more value than a ruby, and gold has more value than silver, an Apple mobile device has more value than a Nokia, etc. If you come to marketing from the vantage point of added meaning, it suggests that choices consumers make have great symbolic connotations, both within their life and without. From that perspective, the marketer has a responsibility to do the right thing by those consumers – the brand’s peers within their share of culture – who are choosing a certain product in order to craft their identity. The trust and respect between brand and buyer has been established. The result of building this sort of reciprocal bond is that you move customers from being loyalists to being advocates by establishing a very strong sense of brand affinity through meaning.

 

 

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The Rise of eSports

Since the advent and growth of eSports giants like Dota 2 and League of Legends, the gaming community has called for mainstream recognition regarding legitimacy. Take Colin Cowherd’s 2015 rant against esports for example. There are undeniable similarities between professional gaming and conventional sports, but the arguments have generally been ineffective in dispelling traditional beliefs formed by the collective generations of sports fans prior. While it is easy to dismiss playing video games as anything resembling an athletic endeavor, it is more complex than just noting the relative lack of physicality and declaring  as non-sports.

At their very essence,  are video games played in a competitive environment. Sometimes the games can be played one-on-one, other times, teams will square off against each other. But the key point in all of this is that  are competitive events. They are all about opposing players or teams doing battle in a real-time competition.

What’s In A Name? The traditional definition of professional sport is: all forms of competitive physical activity which, through organized participation, aim to provide entertainment to spectators and provide an income for the athletes, who in turn devote time training to increase their skills and experience to modern levels of achievement. But physicality alone cannot be the mark by which we measure “sport”. After all, look at poker. Poker is frequently broadcast on ESPN and other networks. This is equally true for chess and the National Spelling Bee. Is there anything remotely physical about playing poker? Or chess? Or a spelling bee? No.

And yet, all of these events are considered sporting events by probably the most recognizable sports network on the planet. Furthermore, players of  employ a strategies that play to their strengths while exploiting the weaknesses of their opponents. If the game being played is a team-based game, then teamwork is essential. Like any other athlete, players have tremendous reflexes, dexterity, and problem-solving skills. So, what exactly accounts for how we define “sports” and what does it mean for marketers?

The Conceptual Breakdown. Judging another culture solely by the values and standards of one’s own culture is termed ethnocentrism. People born into or surrounded by a particular culture begin absorbing its values and behaviors and build a worldview centered around these principles as the norm. Within the context of , this concept explains the psychology behind a lot of mainstream dismissal. Quite simply  don’t fit easily into our cultural definition of what sports should be. We do the same thing with other cultural categories all the time. For example, people in the U.S. struggle to classify crickets as food even though they are healthy, tasty, and plentiful. So, the struggle, whether it’s crickets or esports, is a reflection of cultural norms.

While ethnocentrism lends to maintaining the cultural status quo, generational gap is a concept referring to the differences between people of younger generations and their elders. It is the conflict between these groups which has catalyzed a lot of recent cultural change. This allows for members of the younger generation to form their own identities and cultures outside of older and mainstream influences. This is important to the development of  because despite its young age, its rapid growth foreshadows a change in the mainstream attitude towards it. The younger generation is growing up participating in and watching , thus making them part of their cultural norm. Within the next five years, there will be enough members in the community to challenge the mainstream dismissal of  and even gain the respect of the older generation regarding its legitimacy. And that should have everyone involved in marketing thinking.

Going Mainstream. Regardless of how you view , they are growing in popularity every year by leaps and bounds. Esports are on the verge of breaking out of their niche communities into mainstream focus. According to Newzoo, a company specializing in esports analytics, it’s estimated that the global esports economy will grow by 41% by the end of this year to $696 million and reach $1.49 billion by 2020. Keep in mind that includes more than the game itself, it includes media rights, advertising, sponsorships, merchandising and ticket sale. Like any other sport, it means reach extends well beyond the game.

The numbers speak for themselves, but also consider this: The renowned IMG Academy, an elite boarding school and training program in Florida geared for athletes in basketball, football, and other traditional sports, recently added an esports training program that includes physical, mental, and nutritional aspects. In other words, one of the most successful and prestigious sports-focused schools in the country believes so much in the future of esports that they have developed a training program around it. The outcome of generational gap is something IMG has identified and they are betting on significant changes in how we think of sports as a society.

Legitimacy also continues to be added as traditional sports team owners such as New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft and the organization that runs the New York Mets, Sterling Equities, have begun to make multi-million dollar investments in esports leagues. Cities like Washington D.C. have even outfitted their professional basketball arenas for live esports taking a well-calculated gamble that esports are here to stay.

That growth and investment around esports has started catching the eye of big-name brands including Arby’s, Coca-Cola, Audi, and Gillette to name a few. That’s because they see an opportunity to reach a demographic sweet spot, namely males between the ages of 21 to 35. They have cash, they’ve grown up gaming, and they are increasingly hard to reach via traditional advertising. Newzoo estimates the current global  audience at 385 million people, including 191 million enthusiasts and 194 million occasional viewers.

It’s estimated that the global eSports economy will grow by 41% by the end of this year to $696 million and reach $1.49 billion by 2020. Keep in mind that includes more than the game itself, it includes media rights, advertising, sponsorships, merchandising and ticket sale. Like any other sport, it means reach extends well beyond the game.

The numbers speak for themselves, but also consider this: The renowned IMG Academy, an elite boarding school and training program in Florida geared for athletes in basketball, football, and other traditional sports, recently added an esports training program that includes physical, mental, and nutritional aspects. In other words, one of the most successful and prestigious sports-focused schools in the country believes so much in the future of esports that they have developed a training program around it. The outcome of generational gap is something IMG has identified and they are betting on significant changes in how we think of sports as a society.

Spending by eSports still falls decidedly short of traditional sports. Enthusiasts will spend an average of $3.64 per person following the sport this year, according to Newzoo. Compared against basketball, on which fans spend an average of $15 each, and the short-term gains aren’t there for many brands. But like all things with esports, the numbers don’t tell the whole story. One reason for the discrepancy is that esports content is largely available for free and the money spent on merchandise remains relatively small. But spending is rising and expected to reach $5.20 per fan by 2020. Another reason is that eSports are drawing a younger crowd with less disposable income – for now. And this is where thinking about the long game becomes important. Building brand affinity and share of culture means building connections that last a lifetime. The earlier you bring a population into the fold, the sooner you become essential to the deeper cultural conversation. You aren’t reacting, you’re creating.

In the end, it doesn’t matter if eSports are seen as sports. People in the industry can identify similarities and use conventional sports as an example to adapt and grow the eSports culture. Growth in target audience involvement is currently more important than acceptance of members outside the base. And for brands hoping to remain relevant, having a presence in the eSports environment is extremely important.

 

 

AI, Advertising, and Culture

In an ever-increasingly connected world, artificial intelligence is beginning to find its way into every aspect of our lives. We are “on” 24/7and we rely more and more on our  devices, particularly our mobile devices, to help us make decisions. That rapid increase in computing power has done more than help the user. It has equipped companies with an unprecedented capacity to automate processes that previously required hours, days, and weeks of human effort. AI has allowed companies to target, adjust, and adapt at an unimaginable pace. In the same way that Siri acts as a personal assistant for its users, marketing companies are now tapping into AI to act as a personal assistant in the creation of highly effective marketing campaigns.

Currently, agencies (and their clients) use AI to sort Machine-Learning-AI-in-Finance-11-04-2016-A-1200x1200.jpg
through assets to determine and/or refine the target audience, to gather data about how to best position a brand in various contexts, and to create varied advertisements intended for a wide variety of mediums, including everything from billboards to social media. The final piece is still largely in its infancy, but will no doubt continue to grow and evolve as AI become faster and smarter. Today, the goal of AI in advertising is to optimize campaigns by placing ads in front of the right customer at the right time. As technologies evolve, advertisers will be able to limit their ads on the basis of a huge array of parameters, most of which we’re all familiar with. Targeting an individual will be based on hundreds of parameters and actions, all quantified and measure in the blink of an eye. And creative (and its placement) will adapt in near real-time. In other words, they’ll be able to micro-target at a faster pace than we can imagine.

All of that makes sense, but humans are more than individuals, we are part of broader cultural systems, which means context and cultural cues matter. Yes, each customer is unique and therefore each customer journey is unique. However, there are broader social, symbolic, and cultural forces that guide our behavior depending on the situation at hand. So, the question is, can AI account for those cultural patterns and processes?

Considering the rapid developments in machine and deep learning, these systems will become increasingly capable of teaching themselves to make more precise and effective decisions based on a broader set of inputs. Ultimately this means that for AI to be truly move beyond transactional relevance, it will need to have a more balanced approach, which is to have a robust understanding of people’s aspirations, interactions with each other, and social connections. What are they trying to get done, what are the barriers to that, how do they create a sense of belonging, etc.?

We create culture, interact with it, are affected by it, and can even be destroyed by it. Culture applies its own logic, has a memory, endures after its makers are gone, can be repurposed in supple ways, and can induce action. Because culture can do things we cannot do as individuals, like fostering collective action or making life easier by providing unspoken assumptions on which we can base our lives, AI will need to evolve to do more than react to clicks.

 

 

Story, Development, and Design

Storytelling is not simply narrative. It is an opportunity to communicate values in a way that is resonant and memorable, allowing the people taking it in to position themselves in the story, see its relevance to their current situation, and then play forward a narrative about their own role in the story of now. It’s a way of uncovering the complexities of a person’s world and designing within that context.

How does this happen? It happens through stories in which a human protagonist is presented with an unknown and has to make a choice. At this moment of choice, the listener feels the tension of what might go right and wrong, projects herself into that situation and, in so doing, experiences the values with which the protagonist wrestles. So how does it relate to development and design?

Story art and craft is one of the best and oldest ways to engage an audience. We approach every project, regardless of its size or scope, from this perspective. Not just story-first, but structure first. Just like screenwriters do or authors do. There are, of course, countless books on story art and craft, typically for writers, filmmakers, game designers and artists, but they’re rarely, if ever, written for the people who build websites, software, tools, services, etc. that are not necessarily art or entertainment.

Designers, product managers, developers, content strategists, they can all benefit from taking on a storytelling approach in the process of creation. Take for example the use of experience maps. The maps try to represent an actual example of how a person (or persona) went through and did something they wanted to do. The maps are generally chronological, moving forward through the hours of the persona’s actions one stage at a time. The phrase “experience map” came about because we tend to want to create tools most relevant to the job we’re assigned, but in practice we need to be agnostic of whether the persona is using digital tools or not, or a combination to tools. The map represents the journey a person takes from the idea of accomplishing something to having accomplished that thing in the end. We want to see how it all hangs together from the persona’s perspective.

There can be as many experience/journey maps for a particular persona as there are deviations in the way they do that thing. For example, if a persona was taking a commercial flight, there might be different maps for a business-related flight than a leisure-oriented flight. There might be different maps based on whether it’s a last-minute or urgent flight. There might be different maps for long versus short flights, flights where the persona has to get work done before landing, flights where the persona is scared of flying, etc. The relevance is that the mental model represents a set of states of mind (mental spaces) that a person might pop into and out of during this journey toward accomplishing a goal. The states of mind might proceed in a nice linear fashion. Or they might represent a more cyclical approach, where the person revisits a previous state of mind again to re-evaluate something, to continue something, or to address something new that has come up. And therein lies the power of storytelling. We are designing with the notion that the goal and the steps to achieving it are front and center. Taking this approach not only allows for better design, it ensures that the things we construct are tied into the broader ecosystem in which people operate.

 

Brands, Ads, and Culture

The old advertising model advocated the creation of an external brand image to influence consumers. It talked about benefits, it talked about the company, it promised to give you sex appeal. Those times are long past. This is partly due to the sheer number of channels in which people interact, but we believe there is a deeper reason. And that deeper reason is that successful brands both reflect and transform culture. In other words, talking about what you do is no longer enough. To compete in today’s landscape, you have to convey why you exist and connect it to how people experience their world.

Today we’re seeing that certain issues which could be considered secondary to a brand are suddenly primary. People are not just choosing the best, the sexiest, or the cheapest. They’re choosing brands that have meaning. Their concept of nature, of self, of society takes center stage. And this is where brands taking on a new and intriguing role.

So, what role does brand play in this landscape? The simple answer is that brands become symbols for crafting identity. They introduce, reflect, and influence meaning. The most resonant brands are creating value not just by the products or services they represent, but by the symbolic power they impart.

We believe that to be relevant and long-lasting, a brand must operate like a member of a culture. A company must share out its core values and articulate WHY it exists. A brand must stand for something and drive people to participate in it, become part of it. People want to belong to something bigger than themselves. People need to be part of a tribe.

Advertising for a Better World

Advertising is a visible face of business and as such, often takes a fair amount of heat– sometimes deservedly, sometimes not. We are at the heart of every argument against consumerism, questionable corporate practices, etc. And there is some truth to the criticisms that arise. But it’s worth noting that as an industry, we have the capacity to change the world in very meaningful ways and have, in fact, done so on more than one occasion. In fact, we are doing it more and more often with remarkable success.

There’s nothing necessarily new in this. The shift began in the 1960s in the form of a largely forgotten ad man by the name of Howard Gossage. His agency was in San Francisco. He worked for commercial clients but soon got bored and turned his attention to social issues and causes.

Agencies have always done work for charities and nonprofit groups, but this was the first time anyone had used the power of advertising for social and environmental good. He prevented the power companies from flooding the Grand Canyon, casually named a young environmental group “Friends of the Earth” and planned the Summer of Love from his agency. And the result was to redefine much of how we in the industry view our mission.

Recently, a story ran on 60 Minutes about the role advertising had in bringing a long and brutal conflict to an end. For decades, the Colombian government was fighting the guerrilla organization known as FARC. It was an unending cycle of violence and every strategy had ultimately come up short. As a last resort, the government went to advertising executive Jose Miguel Sokoloff. The idea was to use advertising, not bullets, to convince the FARC to demilitarize. The campaign and strategy was to focus on reconciliation and bringing FARC members back home. The result was that the majority of the FARC demilitarized, peace talks were arranged, and Colombia began to see the social and economic benefits.

Screen Shot 2017-01-17 at 10.31.26 AM.pngIn another outstanding campaign, TBWA launched an outdoor campaign in Finland for the Helsinki Police over the Christmas holidays that had a hyper-local, reactive element to it. When a domestic violence call into 911 (112 in Helsinki), the agency immediately put up anti-violence PSA posters on the 15 outdoor placements nearest to the home that made the call. The creative itself is also innovative. It shows a kitchen scene, which during the daytime looks normal, but after dark, a background lights switches on to reveal the signs of domestic violence.

Closer to home, Luckie & Co. worked with its partners to help make bring civil rights experience to life, particularly for younger generations. Screen Shot 2017-01-17 at 9.43.43 AM.pngIt’s hard to find a place that holds the civil rights struggle closer to its heart than Alabama. The state has made it a mission to turn a complicated, often painful history into a learning experience that does more than present the facts – it means to bring the story to life in an interactive, deeply resonant way. Luckie worked across multiple channels to tell a very human story that has drawn accolades and visitors from around the world.

The question is: how do we ensure we do this sort of thing more often? How do we become positive agents of change regularly rather than sporadically? I think the answer boils down to several key principles. Be strategic, be bold, and be determined. First, it’s not enough to get attention, you have to have a plan that will work over time, across multiple channels. You have to know every nuance of story being told and the audience that will receive it. Without a strategic plan, tactics will have no grounding and won’t produce meaningful change. Second, being bold means being will to disrupt, sometimes shock, and always have a clear point of view. This can be difficult with some clients because their need is to mitigate risk. Being bold is frightening. But without taking a strong stand, the message is easily lost in the sea of messaging we experience every day. Furthermore, change means confronting difficult issues, something people readily shy away from if given the chance. Unless your campaign, platform, etc. makes people stop and reflect, it simply won’t work. Finally, being determined means not wavering in the face of opposition, whether internal or external. That’s easier said than done in many case, but in order for your plan to have real impact, it will have to be “sold” again and again. Being strategic and being bold is threatening, which means clients will often shoot for the lowest common denominator. And to be fair, it’s a normal reaction. So, be prepared to defend your position again and again until you start to see results. Until you see the world change.

Context and the Changing Mobile Landscape

Marketers increasingly think about consumers in complex ways. It is understood that in a changing digital landscape, the context in which they learn and shop influences what messages we deliver and how we deliver them.  But we rarely define “context”. It is one thing to design a usable app that conforms to human factors and cognitive requirements, but it is quite another to design a stage in an environment when there are innumerable semi-autonomous devices mediating in a swirl of information.

Physical Context

Physical context refers to the notion of infusing devices with a sense of “place.”  In other words, devices can distinguish the environments in which they “live” and react to them. But this is difficult. Mapping out longitude and latitude is one thing, but reacting to features (political, natural, social, etc.) is much more problematic. Getting beyond the boundaries of identifiable borders and structures, means coming to grips with “place”.

Think of a mall.  There are hundreds of stores, each with hundreds of devices. The device now has to decode what information is relevant and how it will deliver information. What competing retailer apps get precedence over others? When you receive an offer, will the device “tell” other retailers in order to generate real-time counter offers? The digital landscape is continuous at all points throughout the day and getting design right means understanding the systems in which people operate.

Device Context

Just as various kinds of sensory apparatus (GPS-receivers, proximity sensors, etc.) are the means by which mobile devices will become geographically aware, another class of sensors makes it possible for devices to become aware of each other. This presents a series of problems that are different than those of physical context.

Technology is on the verge of existing in a world with zero-infrastructure networks that can spring up anywhere, anytime. Devices will exist in a constant state of discovery.  Returning to the mall, imagine that you are with a friend whose device is communicating with yours.  In the mall are a couple of thousand devices, all of which are discovering each other.  What happens now?  Assuming we’ve dealt with the problem of one friend’s device communicating with the other friend’s device while blocking out the other 2000 devices, you still have several thousand potential “identities” that may have useful information.  How is it decided what to manage without devoting significant time to setting up the hundreds of variables?

Information Context

This is the realm of information architecture. Data no longer resides “in” our computers.  Devices are extensions of the cloud and exist as something akin to perceptual prostheses.  They exist to manipulate data in the same way a joy stick allows us to handle the arms of robot in a factory.  This reflects a shift in how we use information because all information is transitory.

Storage issues are essentially removed from the equation.  Content can leap from place to place and device to device in an instant. Content will be customizable and reflect the human-application interaction rather than shaping it. Devices will find themselves in the fourth kind of context of social interaction, with all its contingencies. Just as behavior is shaped by the moment, so too will the apps and information needed to adapt.

Socio-Cultural Context

Each person is unique to contrasting cultures, tongues, traditions and world views. A cultural context may exist on levels as diverse as a workplace, a family, a building, a county, a continent, a hemisphere. Cultural context provides a framework for what “works” for each consumer in the world.

It is at this point where a better perspective is gained on what will and will not be accepted in the mobile universe. Take a beer pouring app that mimics the pouring of a beer when the device is tilted.  It serves no direct function and yet it has been successful because of the cultural needs it to which it speaks – workplace breaks, male-to-male bonding, etc. But in another context, say Saudi Arabia, the context shifts. Success lies in understanding the reasons behind the consumers beliefs and actions in the symbolic exchanges, and the ability to code and decode those exchanges.  Marketing mishaps come from a lack of comprehension.

So What?

Our great technological leaps forward have also produced more complexity, leading to a greater need to make sense of insights. Without a means to categorize context, marketers will miss identifying trends that matter most. What to do?

  • Rethink the problem. Frequently, “the problem” is a facet of something else. For example, when researching an eBook the problem to be solved isn’t technology, it is understanding why people read different material in different contexts. It may be about displaying books as a means of gaining status. The point is the problem seen may not be the problem at all.
  • Define the contexts. Defining the contexts helps articulate the range of possibilities for observation. For example, if the consumer behavior is drinking beer, all contexts in which beer is purchased and consumed need to be articulated.
  • Think through the sample. Who is the marketing targeting? What are the social circles that will shape the event? It isn’t enough to define a demographic sample, you need to think in terms of cultural systems.
  • Make a plan that involves experiential information gathering, not just statistics. Develop a guide to navigate the data collection and a method for managing the data (everything is data). Don’t  just think about the questions to ask, but also include opportunities for observation and participation.
  • Head into the field. This is the heart of the process. Meaningful insights and moments of “truth” are slow to get at. Low-hanging fruit will be easy to spot, but the goal should be to find those deeper meanings. Because everything is data, from attitudes to artifacts, it is important to capture as much as possible.
  • Do the analysis. Analysis is the most difficult, but also the most rewarding. The goal is to bring a deep understanding of cultural behavior to the analysis process. This goes beyond casual observation and gets to the underlying structures of why people do what they do.

The process is more time consuming than traditional approaches, but it ultimately yields greater insight and reduces time and costs on the back end. The end result is that you create greater value for the client and for the company.